Brexit and your pet

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55A3363D-ACAE-41CF-9D0C-864372973D06BREXIT
My apologies we are all fed up with listening to Brexit matters
From October 31 if as we expect the Uk leave the EU the following rules will apply.
It appears to me that you should check your EU pet passport if it’s Uk issued it will no longer be valid
( The simplest cheapest and easiest thing to do in my mind is to get an Irish issued passport before this date )
Changes to the rules for pet (cats, dogs, ferrets) travel between Ireland and the UK after Brexit, if the UK leaves the EU without a deal
To: Private Veterinary Practitioners
This is a reminder of possible changes to rules for pet travel between Ireland and the UK after Brexit, if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.
The Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine advises that pet owners intending to travel with their pet dog, cat or ferret between Ireland and the UK after the UK leaves the EU should contact their private veterinary practitioner well in advance of their travel date (at least two months) to ensure adequate time to prepare for the possible changes to pet travel rules.
Currently a pet dog, cat or ferret travelling between Ireland and the UK must:
1. be microchipped before the rabies vaccination is administered. (Pets may be tattooed instead of microchipped, but only if the tattoo was applied before 03 July 2011.);
2. be vaccinated against rabies by a private veterinary practitioner;
3. have a valid EU pet identification document (pet passport or an EU health cert).
Scenario 1: travelling with a pet from Ireland to the UK and
returning to Ireland, after Brexit
If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the rules for bringing a pet dog, cat or ferret into the EU, including Ireland, will change.
For pet owners bringing a pet dog, cat or ferret from the UK to Ireland, or travelling to the UK with their pet and returning to Ireland, the following requirements will apply:
The pet dog/cat/ferret must:
1. be microchipped before the rabies vaccination is administered, with its microchip number recorded in its pet identification document before the rabies vaccination is administered (Pets may be tattooed instead of microchipped, but only if the tattoo was applied before 03 July 2011);
2. be vaccinated against rabies by a private veterinary practitioner;
3. for travel from Ireland to the UK – have an EU pet passport or an EU health certificate;
4. for travel, or return, from the UK to Ireland – have an EU pet passport (not a UK-issued EU pet passport*), or a health certificate for entry into the EU, issued by a UK government veterinarian. This health certificate will be valid for:
 10 days for entry into the EU/Ireland, from the date of issue of the cert, and


4 months for onward travel within the EU, from the date of endorsement of the cert, on entry into the EU
The pet will need a new health certificate for each trip from the UK to the EU.
*After the Brexit date, a pet may not enter Ireland (or any EU country) on an EU pet passport issued in the UK, as this will no longer be a valid document. Pet owners should be advised to retain their UK-issued pet passport if they have one, as it may contain important information about vaccinations, treatments, etc.;
5. have a rabies antibody titration test (blood test).
IMPORTANT: Pet owners should arrange the rabies titration test in Ireland before they travel to the UK. If the blood sample is drawn in the UK after the UK leaves the EU (without a deal), the pet must wait three months from the date the successful blood sample was taken before it may travel to an EU country. This three month wait is not necessary if the blood sample is drawn in an EU country.
The pet must wait at least 30 days after the rabies vaccine was administered before the blood test may be carried out. The private veterinary practitioner must send the blood sample to an EU- approved blood testing laboratory. Currently, there are no EU-approved rabies serology laboratories in Ireland. The current list of EU-approved laboratories, including two approved facilities in the UK, is available at this link: https://ec.europa.eu/food/animals/pet- movement/approved-labs_en.
It may take several weeks for the blood test to be processed (for exact processing times, the laboratory should be contacted).
A successful blood test will show a rabies antibody level of at least 0.5 IU/ml.
If, following a successful blood test result, the pet’s rabies booster vaccinations are kept up to
date, the titration test will not have to be repeated.
If the blood test is not successful, a repeat vaccination will be needed and a blood test must be carried out at least 30 days after this repeat vaccination.
The veterinarian must give the pet owner a copy of the test results and record in the pet passport, or health certificate, confirmation that the test was carried out and that the result was successful.
6. Dogs travelling, or returning, from the UK to Ireland require treatment against Echinococcus multilocularis (tapeworm) by a veterinarian 24 to 120 hours (1 to 5 days) before arrival in Ireland.
7. A pet owner travelling with a pet dog, cat or ferret into Ireland from the UK must give the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine advance notice by email before arrival.
Scenario 2: travelling with a pet from Ireland to the UK
The UK Government has indicated that rules for entry into the UK with a pet dog, cat or ferret may not change for some time after Brexit. The most up to date UK guidance may be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/pet-travel-to-europe-after-brexit.
Any queries may be directed to livetrade@agriculture.gov.ie.55A3363D-ACAE-41CF-9D0C-864372973D06