Brexit and your Pet

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My apologies we are all fed up with listening to Brexit matters
From October 31 if as we expect the Uk leave the EU the following rules will apply.
It appears to me that you should check your EU pet passport if it’s Uk issued it will no longer be valid
( The simplest cheapest and easiest thing to do in my mind is to get an Irish issued passport before this date )
Changes to the rules for pet (cats, dogs, ferrets) travel between Ireland and the UK after Brexit, if the UK leaves the EU without a deal
To: Private Veterinary Practitioners
This is a reminder of possible changes to rules for pet travel between Ireland and the UK after Brexit, if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.
The Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine advises that pet owners intending to travel with their pet dog, cat or ferret between Ireland and the UK after the UK leaves the EU should contact their private veterinary practitioner well in advance of their travel date (at least two months) to ensure adequate time to prepare for the possible changes to pet travel rules.
Currently a pet dog, cat or ferret travelling between Ireland and the UK must:
1. be microchipped before the rabies vaccination is administered. (Pets may be tattooed instead of microchipped, but only if the tattoo was applied before 03 July 2011.);
2. be vaccinated against rabies by a private veterinary practitioner;
3. have a valid EU pet identification document (pet passport or an EU health cert).
Scenario 1: travelling with a pet from Ireland to the UK and
returning to Ireland, after Brexit
If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the rules for bringing a pet dog, cat or ferret into the EU, including Ireland, will change.
For pet owners bringing a pet dog, cat or ferret from the UK to Ireland, or travelling to the UK with their pet and returning to Ireland, the following requirements will apply:
The pet dog/cat/ferret must:
1. be microchipped before the rabies vaccination is administered, with its microchip number recorded in its pet identification document before the rabies vaccination is administered (Pets may be tattooed instead of microchipped, but only if the tattoo was applied before 03 July 2011);
2. be vaccinated against rabies by a private veterinary practitioner;
3. for travel from Ireland to the UK – have an EU pet passport or an EU health certificate;
4. for travel, or return, from the UK to Ireland – have an EU pet passport (not a UK-issued EU pet passport*), or a health certificate for entry into the EU, issued by a UK government veterinarian. This health certificate will be valid for:
 10 days for entry into the EU/Ireland, from the date of issue of the cert, and


4 months for onward travel within the EU, from the date of endorsement of the cert, on entry into the EU
The pet will need a new health certificate for each trip from the UK to the EU.
*After the Brexit date, a pet may not enter Ireland (or any EU country) on an EU pet passport issued in the UK, as this will no longer be a valid document. Pet owners should be advised to retain their UK-issued pet passport if they have one, as it may contain important information about vaccinations, treatments, etc.;
5. have a rabies antibody titration test (blood test).
IMPORTANT: Pet owners should arrange the rabies titration test in Ireland before they travel to the UK. If the blood sample is drawn in the UK after the UK leaves the EU (without a deal), the pet must wait three months from the date the successful blood sample was taken before it may travel to an EU country. This three month wait is not necessary if the blood sample is drawn in an EU country.
The pet must wait at least 30 days after the rabies vaccine was administered before the blood test may be carried out. The private veterinary practitioner must send the blood sample to an EU- approved blood testing laboratory. Currently, there are no EU-approved rabies serology laboratories in Ireland. The current list of EU-approved laboratories, including two approved facilities in the UK, is available at this link: https://ec.europa.eu/food/animals/pet- movement/approved-labs_en.
It may take several weeks for the blood test to be processed (for exact processing times, the laboratory should be contacted).
A successful blood test will show a rabies antibody level of at least 0.5 IU/ml.
If, following a successful blood test result, the pet’s rabies booster vaccinations are kept up to
date, the titration test will not have to be repeated.
If the blood test is not successful, a repeat vaccination will be needed and a blood test must be carried out at least 30 days after this repeat vaccination.
The veterinarian must give the pet owner a copy of the test results and record in the pet passport, or health certificate, confirmation that the test was carried out and that the result was successful.
6. Dogs travelling, or returning, from the UK to Ireland require treatment against Echinococcus multilocularis (tapeworm) by a veterinarian 24 to 120 hours (1 to 5 days) before arrival in Ireland.
7. A pet owner travelling with a pet dog, cat or ferret into Ireland from the UK must give the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine advance notice by email before arrival.
Scenario 2: travelling with a pet from Ireland to the UK
The UK Government has indicated that rules for entry into the UK with a pet dog, cat or ferret may not change for some time after Brexit. The most up to date UK guidance may be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/pet-travel-to-europe-after-brexit.
Any queries may be directed to livetrade@agriculture.gov.ie.55A3363D-ACAE-41CF-9D0C-864372973D06

Blue Green Algae Poisoning in Dogs

What is blue-green algae and what does it look like?

Blue-green algae is a term used to describe a group of bacteria, called cyanobacteria.

They are not actually algae, but the organisms got this name because they often give the appearance of algae when they clump together in bodies of water.

Blue-green algae brown clumps

The bacteria cannot be seen with the naked eye unless they clump together. When this happens, blue-green algae can look like green flakes, greenish bundles or brown dots in a pond, lake or stream.

When the algae blooms, it can give look like a blue-green scum has appeared on the surface of the water. It sometimes looks a bit like pea soup.

Blooms of the organisms often build up around the edges of ponds and lakes, which may look like foam.

It is most common in non-flowing fresh water such as lakes and ponds during hot weather when there is less rainfall, but can also occur at other times of the year.

You may notice dead fish in ponds or lakes with a high concentration of the toxic bacteria. Don’t let your dog drink from water containing dead animals.

The algae may be present in a harmful form even if you cannot see it, so take note of any warning signs in the area.

Why is blue-green algae dangerous to dogs?

Blooms of blue-green algae can produce harmful toxins which stop a dog’s liver from functioning properly. However, not all types of blue-green algae are dangerous.

Sadly, exposure to toxic blue-green algae is often fatal, and can also cause long term health problems in dogs that survive after drinking or swimming in algae-contaminated water. Some types of blue-green algae can kill a dog just 15 minutes to an hour after drinking contaminated water.

Dogs who have been swimming in water can get the algae caught in their fur, and can ingest it while cleaning themselves later on.

Concentrations of the algae vary throughout the year and may not always be harmful – but you can’t tell simply by looking at them whether or not they are dangerous, so it is best not to run the risk of allowing your dog to come into contact with water where the algae may be present.

What are the symptoms of blue-green algae poisoning?

a sign warns of blue-green algae in water

If your dog shows any of the following signs after drinking from, or swimming or paddling in water, contact your vet immediately and tell them you are concerned about blue-green algae:

  • Vomiting/being sick
  • Diarrhoea
  • Seizures/fitting
  • Weakness/collapse/unconsciousness
  • Disorientation/confusion
  • Drooling
  • Breathing difficulties

There is no antidote for the toxins produced by the bacteria, but if caught early enough, your vet will likely try to make your dog sick and attempt to flush the toxins from the body before they take hold.

Sadly, blue-green algae poisoning often eventually causes fatal liver failure.

These symptoms are commonly seen with other illnesses too, which are often less serious, but you should always call your vet if you are worried your pet is sick.

How can I protect my dog from blue-green algae?

Keep your dog away from lakes and ponds that you know, or suspect may, contain blue-green algae.

Dogs should not be allowed to swim or paddle in water that contains blue-green algae.

Don’t let dogs drink from water that may have blue-green algae in. Because the wind often blows blooms of algae to the edges of ponds or lakes, higher concentrations of the toxin are more likely to be present in the parts of the water your dog may drink from.

Take note of signs warning of the algae during dog walks and follow the information given.

 

Blue Green Algae Poisoning in Dogs

What is blue-green algae and what does it look like?

Blue-green algae is a term used to describe a group of bacteria, called cyanobacteria.

They are not actually algae, but the organisms got this name because they often give the appearance of algae when they clump together in bodies of water.

Blue-green algae brown clumps

The bacteria cannot be seen with the naked eye unless they clump together. When this happens, blue-green algae can look like green flakes, greenish bundles or brown dots in a pond, lake or stream.

When the algae blooms, it can give look like a blue-green scum has appeared on the surface of the water. It sometimes looks a bit like pea soup.

Blooms of the organisms often build up around the edges of ponds and lakes, which may look like foam.

It is most common in non-flowing fresh water such as lakes and ponds during hot weather when there is less rainfall, but can also occur at other times of the year.

You may notice dead fish in ponds or lakes with a high concentration of the toxic bacteria. Don’t let your dog drink from water containing dead animals.

The algae may be present in a harmful form even if you cannot see it, so take note of any warning signs in the area.

Why is blue-green algae dangerous to dogs?

Blooms of blue-green algae can produce harmful toxins which stop a dog’s liver from functioning properly. However, not all types of blue-green algae are dangerous.

Sadly, exposure to toxic blue-green algae is often fatal, and can also cause long term health problems in dogs that survive after drinking or swimming in algae-contaminated water. Some types of blue-green algae can kill a dog just 15 minutes to an hour after drinking contaminated water.

Dogs who have been swimming in water can get the algae caught in their fur, and can ingest it while cleaning themselves later on.

Concentrations of the algae vary throughout the year and may not always be harmful – but you can’t tell simply by looking at them whether or not they are dangerous, so it is best not to run the risk of allowing your dog to come into contact with water where the algae may be present.

What are the symptoms of blue-green algae poisoning?

a sign warns of blue-green algae in water

If your dog shows any of the following signs after drinking from, or swimming or paddling in water, contact your vet immediately and tell them you are concerned about blue-green algae:

  • Vomiting/being sick
  • Diarrhoea
  • Seizures/fitting
  • Weakness/collapse/unconsciousness
  • Disorientation/confusion
  • Drooling
  • Breathing difficulties

There is no antidote for the toxins produced by the bacteria, but if caught early enough, your vet will likely try to make your dog sick and attempt to flush the toxins from the body before they take hold.

Sadly, blue-green algae poisoning often eventually causes fatal liver failure.

These symptoms are commonly seen with other illnesses too, which are often less serious, but you should always call your vet if you are worried your pet is sick.

How can I protect my dog from blue-green algae?

Keep your dog away from lakes and ponds that you know, or suspect may, contain blue-green algae.

Dogs should not be allowed to swim or paddle in water that contains blue-green algae.

Don’t let dogs drink from water that may have blue-green algae in. Because the wind often blows blooms of algae to the edges of ponds or lakes, higher concentrations of the toxin are more likely to be present in the parts of the water your dog may drink from.

Take note of signs warning of the algae during dog walks and follow the information given.

 

Ticks on Dogs and Cats

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PLEASE START treating and prevention of TICKS now as we already are seeing them on animals and people probably as a result of the mild winter.
Killarney with its abundant deer and wildlife has the highest population of ticks in the country and they can act as carriers for Lyme Disease and other infections .While  April to September is normally the main risk period we are already seeing pets on pets this year .

What are ticks?
Ticks are blood-sucking external parasites of humans, pets, livestock and wild animals. They are also vectors of a wide variety of disease-causing organisms to animals including humans. There are around 850 described species worldwide, of which only a few exist in Ireland. Only one species is common in Ireland – Ixodes ricinus – Ticks are wingless and do not fly or jump.

Why do I need to be concerned about ticks?
Ticks are efficient hunters, waiting (“questing”) in brush or tall grass and when they sense vibration, carbon-dioxide (CO2), warmth and humidity, from a passing animal (or human), they climb aboard, attach and start to feed on its blood. Immature ticks are flat and only 0.5-3mm in size. They have special mouthparts which allow them to attach to their hosts. During the attachment process the tick uses its secretions mixed with host skin to form a cement which strongly attaches it to the host rendering it difficult to remove. Tick saliva contains an anaesthetic, so your pet will not feel the bite and neither will you!

And once attached, ticks on dogs/cats or other mammals remain—often unnoticed—for several days, making them excellent carriers for disease. Ticks are generally only noticed when they are filled with blood and protrude through the pet’s coat (or a human’s skin). They resemble coffee beans and can vary in colour from grey to red or purple. But ticks aren’t just out in the wilderness—they can be transported much closer to home by rodents and birds. Tick larvae, nymphs or adult ticks can easily end up in residential areas, creating a whole new tick population waiting to be fed in your own garden or neighbourhood park.

Where do ticks hang out?
Ticks are found in habitats that are populated by a supply of vertebrate hosts, mainly mammals and birds. Some of the most productive habitats are rough grasslands, moist woodlands and areas of vegetation around the edge of forests, along forest trails where a dense mat close to the ground provides a warm moist habitat to harbour developmental stages. There is a seasonal risk period for exposure from March to October, mainly influenced by sufficiently high temperature and humidity in the ticks’ environment to initiate activity and questing.

What is the lifespan of a tick?
After feeding, an engorged female falls off to lay 3,000-6,000 eggs! It can take up to 3 years for the adult tick to develop. The eggs are laid in the environment and hatch to larvae which attach to another host, feed, fall off and moult to nymphs. These in turn attach, feed, fall off and moult to an adult completing the life cycle as in the diagram below.

Tick live cycle
How will I know if my pet is affected with ticks?
When ticks bite, they can cause a range of signs including:

Mild skin irritation
Itching and biting of skin
Hair loss
Very heavy infestations in young animals can result in excessive blood loss resulting in anaemia and occasionally death.
It is important to note that many dogs and cats harbouring ticks may not display any signs at all!

Ticks also spread disease, and as external parasites, are second only to mosquitoes in terms of their public health importance worldwide. When a tick feeds, its saliva mixes with the animal’s blood allowing for the transmission of any infectious agents (bacteria and viruses) that they are carrying.

What diseases do ticks transmit in pets?
Tick borne diseases in Ireland and the UK include mainly Lyme disease, but conditions, considered endemic on the continent, may be brought in via infected ticks from other European countries.

How do I control ticks?
Various products are available for controlling ticks. We can advise you on the product of choice for your pet.
We recommend long acting products that prevent Not all products prevent ticks attaching and some only act for short periods so call in to us at The Allcare Veterinary Centre and we can best advise you on the best safest and most appropriate product for your pets .

 

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SKIN DISEASE IN DOGS

Skin problems in Dogs

A variety of skin problems can affect dogs and cats, including allergies, bacterial and fungal infections, and parasite infestations. Most skin problems in pets are curable or manageable, so if your pet seems itchy or has skin that doesn’t look healthy, contact your vet. It is important to have your vet examine your pet to determine the cause of the problem.

What are the causes of skin disease?

A wide variety of skin and coat conditions can cause your pet to itch and scratch, but pinpointing the problem can sometimes be difficult because many skin problems can be very similar. Also, pets may have more than one disorder at the same time, or may have allergic reactions that affect the ears, eyes, GI tract, or respiratory tract (eg asthma) as well as the skin, which can complicate the diagnosis. There are four major categories of skin conditions seen in cats and dogs:

Allergic skin diseases

Allergic skin disease develops when your pet’s immune system overreacts to certain substances (allergens), causing clinical signs that affect the skin. Allergens may come from the environment, such as mould, dust mites, or plant pollen, from parasites, or even from food. Your pet may come into contact with these allergens in several ways:

  • Direct contact with skin. Allergens that are absorbed through the skin, eg chemicals, plant materials, drugs, or natural or artificial materials, cause a condition called atopic disease. When it is associated with just skin disease it is called atopic dermatitis. Direct contact is the most common route of allergen exposure in allergic skin disease.
  • Breathing. This is a less common exposure route than direct contact, but inhaled allergens can also cause atopic disease or atopic dermatitis.
  • Insect bites. Pets that are allergic to insect bites can develop skin disease. Flea allergy is the most common example. Components of flea saliva can cause flea allergy dermatitis in sensitive animals when they are bitten by fleas.
  • Eating. Some cases of allergic skin disease in pets are triggered by an allergy to a protein in the pet’s food or treats. Some pets have atopic dermatitis caused by both food and environmental allergens. Food allergens can also cause food allergy (food hypersensitivity), which often causes vomiting and diarrhoea as well as skin problems.

Allergic skin disease causes itching, and pets that scratch excessively can damage their skin. Sometimes, frequent chewing, scratching, and biting can cause secondary skin infections, wounds, scabs, hair loss, and other problems.

Diagnosing allergic skin disease can be challenging because different types of allergies can have the same clinical signs, and allergic skin disease can look like many other types of skin problems. Your vet will try to rule out other types of skin irritation before making a diagnosis of allergic skin disease.

Ideally, treatment of allergic skin disease involves reducing or eliminating your pet’s exposure to the allergens that are causing the problem. If a pet has a food allergy, a special diet may be prescribed. If your pet is allergic to fleas, safe and effective flea control is essential to controlling the problem. For pets that are allergic to environmental allergens, such as grass or house dust, limiting their exposure to the allergens can be helpful, but this is often difficult, and medications are often necessary. In some cases, allergy testing may be recommended. If the exact allergens that the pet is sensitive to can be identified, a serum can be developed that, when administered to the pet in injections, reduces the pet’s sensitivity to the allergens over time.

Sometimes, the cause of an allergic skin problem can’t be determined right away. Fortunately, your vet can frequently use medication to treat the itching without finding out exactly what the pet is allergic to. Although this is not a “cure”, the pet can be made more comfortable. In general, the best remedy is to avoid whatever it is that sparks the allergic reaction.

Bacterial skin infections

All people (and pets) have bacteria on their skin. In most cases, these bacteria don’t cause a problem. However, if the skin is damaged, such as by scratching, or is unhealthy because of another disease (for example, hormonal problems), a bacterial infection can develop.

Bacterial skin infections, called pyoderma, are not contagious to people or other pets. However, they can cause pustules, crusts, open wounds, and infections that damage the hair follicles (leading to hair loss), and can become a serious medical issue for affected pets.

Bacterial skin infections are usually diagnosed based on the patient’s medical history and the location and appearance of the affected area. Your vet may also want to take a skin sample to look at the cells or to perform bacterial culture and sensitivity or other laboratory testing to determine the cause of the unhealthy skin and the most appropriate treatment. Many bacterial skin infections have an underlying cause, such as a parasite infestation, hormonal or immune system disorder, or allergy. If the underlying cause is not treated appropriately, the skin infection will likely return. In addition to treatment for the underlying cause, your vet may recommend antibiotics, which can be administered in many forms, including pills, injections, shampoos, gels, ointments, and sprays.

Fungal skin infections

The most common fungal organism that causes skin problems in pets is a yeast calledMalassezia.Malasseziainfection generally occurs secondary to another skin problem, such as allergic skin disease or a bacterial skin infection. Fortunately,Malasseziainfection is treatable through a variety of methods (including shampoos, gels/ointments, and pills). The key to resolving the problem for good is to successfully manage the underlying condition.

Ringworm is not a parasite but is actually a relatively common fungal skin infection which causes scaly, crusty skin lesions and hair loss. It can occur anywhere on the body but commonly affects the head and legs. Sometimes the area of hair loss is circular, but not always. Diagnosis is best made from a fungal culture. For this test, your vet will pluck a few hairs from an affected area and place the sample in a special solution to see if the ringworm organism grows.

Ringworm is treatable, usually with medicated baths, ointments/gels, or pills, but complete eradication of the infection can take a month or longer.

Ringworm can be quite contagious to people and other pets. Therefore, children and other household pets should be kept away from an infected pet during the treatment period. People who come into contact with the affected pet should wash their hands regularly.

Parasitic skin diseases

A number of parasites can infest dogs and cats. They can cause itching, which may lead to self-mutilation from excessive scratching and biting and other trauma to the skin. Fleas are one of the biggest culprits.

Pets that are allergic to fleas may scratch excessively, causing redness, wounds, pustules, scabs, and hair loss in the affected areas. Even some pets that aren’t allergic to fleas still experience itching and general misery from these parasites. Other small parasites, such as ticks, chiggers, lice, and biting flies, can also bother pets. For most of these parasites, your vet can recommend a product to control them and protect your pet from their effects.

Mites that can affect dogs and cats include ear mites (which are contagious among pets and cause severe itching and ear infections); sarcoptic mites, which burrow in the skin, causing intense itching and skin lesions (known as scabies or red mange), and are contagious to people in the household; andDemodexmites, which are more common in dogs than in cats and are associated with itching, hair loss, and skin problems.Demodexmites are not contagious.

Most parasitic skin diseases can be diagnosed through direct visualisation of the parasite (such as fleas), or by examining small samples of skin or debris under a microscope to diagnose the problem (such as ear orDemodexmites). All of these parasitic conditions are treatable, so if your pet is itching or you notice any bald areas or skin wounds, contact your vet.

The skin problems listed above are the most common ones that affect dogs and cats, but there are many others, including immune-mediated skin disease, cancer involving the skin, and endocrine (hormonal) problems that affect the skin. Most skin conditions can be controlled, and some can be cured. No matter the cause of your pet’s skin problem, it is possible to ease his or her suffering. When you do, it will be a relief for both of you.

Neutering your pet

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Neutering Information

Female animals: The common name for  a  neutering a female is spaying  which consists of removing the uterus and ovaries. The technical term is ovario-hysterectomy.

  • Male animals: The common name for neutering a male is castration, which involves the removal of the testicles.

Ages for Neutering

  • Bitches (The following is to ensure that the bitch is skeletally mature before neutering):
    • Up to 15kgs, spay at 5.5 months – 7 months
    • 15-35kgs, spay at 7-9 months, after first heat
    • 35kgs + , spay at 18 months
  • Male dogs: 5 months old
  • Cats (both male and female): 4.5 months
  • Rabbits (female): 6-9 months
  • Rabbits (male): 4.5 months
  • Guinea pigs (males only): 4 months

Overpopulation

Ireland has five times more stray dogs than the UK. The chances of a dog becoming a stray and ending up destroyed is 20 times greater for a dog in Ireland than it is for a dog in the UK. There is an overpopulation crises and the ongoing destruction rate of 27 dogs per day in Irish pounds is a result of this crisis. While no official figures exist for numbers of stray or destroyed cats in Ireland, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest that the country’s feline destruction rate is even higher than the canine equivalent.

Reasons for Neutering

  • Neutering increases your pet’s changes for a longer, healthier life – Spaying your female pet reduces her chances of developing mammary cancer and eliminates the threat of uterine and ovarian infections.
  • Neutering your male dog or cat prevents testicular cancer and may prevent prostate problems. Neutered cats are less likely to roam and fight or get killed on the roads.
  • A neutered dog or cat is a better pet – Males neutered early in life are less aggressive towards other dogs and are not distracted by females in heat.
  • Spaying your female pet eliminates the problem of stray males camping in your garden and decreases her desire to roam and breed.
  • Spaying prevents your pet from giving birth to unwanted puppies and kittens. It also stops the messy and difficult twice-annual heat period. You are helping to alleviate the dog and cat overpopulation problems we have in Ireland.

Excuses for Not Neutering

  • “My pet will get fat and lazy”
    Pets that become fat and lazy after being neutered are usually overfed and under exercised.
  • “Shouldn’t a female pet have one litter first?”
    Allowing a female dog/cat to produce a litter does not have any benefits. There are health risks to the mother during the pregnancy and when giving birth. Finding good homes for puppies and kittens is not easy. Even if you manage to place your pet’s offspring, you are condemning to death the numbers of unwanted animals in shelters and pounds who are in desperate need of good homes.
  • “Spaying and Neutering isn’t natural”
    Humans domesticated animals and brought them into our lives. The environment we and our pets live in is very different from the natural one. We have made them dependent on us, which means we are responsible for their well being, just as we are with any other family member.
  • “We can sell the litter and make money”
    Even well known breeders are fortunate if they break even on raising purebred litters. Vaccinations, health care costs and feeding consume most of the profit.
  • “I am concerned about my pet undergoing anaesthesia”
    Although there is always a slight risk involved, anaesthetics used by veterinarians are very safe. The medical benefits of having your pet neutered or spayed far outweigh the slight risk involved with undergoing anaesthesia.

Neutering a Dog

This is a most important subject. Some owners believe it is unfair to deny their pet the opportunity to breed; however, mating is not necessarily advisable for health or happiness.
Every day in Ireland, approximately 27 unwanted and abandoned puppies and dogs have to be put to sleep…..

The average female dog comes on ‘heat’ twice yearly. This may last for 1 month. During this time, a bitch is ready for mating and pregnancy may result. As well as being messy and inconvenient, she will need to be kept apart from male dogs for the duration to prevent unwanted puppies.

Spaying is now a routine operation, performed under general anaesthetic. It usually involves just a day spent at with us, and she will have recovered fully in approximately 2 weeks.

KEYHOLE SPAYING

At the Allcare Veterinary Hospital we offer the option of Laparoscopic neutering which is minimally invasive and had rapid recovery

  • Female dogs are generally spayed about 5.5 months of age, but your pet can be spayed at any age.
  • A spayed bitch will not come into season again, and so will not become pregnant.
  • Spaying prevents womb infections, which are very serious, and can be life threatening.
  • Spayed bitches are far less likely to develop mammary or breast cancer, which can be life threatening also.
  • After spaying dogs will not put on weight, as long as they are fed sensibly and exercised regularly. You may find that your dog does not require as much food after the operation.
  • Contrary to popular belief, neutering has absolutely no affect on a dog’s temperament or personality. It is just an old wives tale that a dog needs to have a litter of puppies.
  • Uncastrated male dog’s behaviour can alter greatly when a local bitch is in heat. They will escape at any opportunity, and may cause or be involved in a road traffic accident; get into fights with other dog’s, or worst of all, get lost and go missing, possibly forever.
  • Male dogs are usually castrated at about 5 months of age, but can be done at any age.
  • Neutering or castrating your dog is another straight forward operation, that usually involves just a day stay with us, and dogs usually make a complete recovery within 2 weeks.
  • As well as making your dog less likely to stray, dog’s tend to be less aggressive and less likely to fight, and often more amenable to training.
  • Castrated dogs will not develop testicular cancer, and are far less likely to have prostate trouble or anal tumours.
  • Neutering your dog is not as expensive as you may think…. It is certainly cheaper than the cost of an unplanned pregnancy and raising a litter of pups, or the vet’s bill following your dog’s road accident.
  • Neutering is the only guaranteed way of preventing unplanned puppies being born, and the needless destruction of thousands of dogs every year.

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It is a sad truth that the number of puppies born every year is far greater than the number of good homes that can be found for them. As a result, thousands of healthy animals are destroyed and many unwanted dogs are left to fend for themselves. Having your dog neutered will not only help to reduce these numbers, it is also one of the simplest, safest and most practical ways of safeguarding your dog’s health and welfare.

What does neutering involve?

Both castration in the male dog and spaying in the female are major operations which need a general anaesthetic. Your dog must be fasted overnight before the operation to reduce the risk of problems on the operating table. Castrating male dogs is a relatively straightforward operation and there is very little chance of anything going wrong. Spaying bitches is more difficult but it is one of the operations most frequently carried out by vets and any experienced vet will have done it many hundreds of times.

Both castration and spaying involve a single cut, into the belly of the female to remove the ovaries and uterus (womb), or into the scrotum of the male dog to take out the testicles. Your dog should be ready to come home on the same day as surgery, as soon as the anaesthetic has worn off. If there are any complications, your vet might keep your dog overnight to keep an eye on them.

What are the benefits of neutering?

Females – Spaying will stop the bleeding that occurs with every heat cycle and prevent any changes in behaviour associated with heat cycle. Females that are not spayed, but who do not have puppies, may develop false pregnancy or infection in the womb. Early spaying of females reduces the risk of them developing mammary cancer (breast cancer) later in life.
Males – Some male dogs develop antisocial behaviour when they reach maturity. This may be in the form of aggressive or sexual behaviour – mounting other dogs or people!! Uncastrated dogs, if left to their own devices, may patrol a wide area in search of a mate and can detect a female in season a long way away. A dog who wanders is far more likely to be involved in a car accident. Castrating male dogs also reduces the risk of them developing diseases of the prostate or testicles in later life.

When should my dog be neutered?

Traditionally, female and male dogs have usually been neutered at about six months old. Before the development of safe anaesthetics and surgical methods, it was believed that a nearly fully grown animal would cope better with the operation. However, some vets now like to neuter animals earlier than this. There is no evidence that such early neutering harms a dog’s later health and physical development. Female dogs are often neutered before their first season. However, if your dog has had a season most vets recommend waiting for 2-4 months after a season (in a mid-cycle phase) before performing the operation. Your vet will be happy to discuss with you the best time for neutering your dog.

Is it ever too late to have my dog neutered?

There is no upper age limit for neutering your dog. You may wish to have your dog neutered if you acquire it as an adult, or once they have retired as a breeding animal. Male dogs can also be castrated later in life and this may reduce certain types of antisocial behaviour. But the older the male is, the more likely that it will carry on showing the less desirable behaviour traits such as aggression or mounting. If older male dogs develop prostate problems, castration may be recommended as the treatment.

Is neutering dangerous?

All operations requiring a general anaesthetic involve a certain amount of risk and, on rare occasions, there may be complications after the operation. Some known complications of the operation are excessive bleeding during the operation and problems with the wound site afterwards. It is important that your dog does not lick or nibble at the wound site. If you are concerned about your dog after the operation, contact your vet immediately.

Will neutering make my dog fat and lazy?

Neutering will not have any significant effect on your dog’s lifestyle apart from eliminating its sexual behaviour. Most owners find that any changes in their dog’s personality are for the better as many neutered dogs are more affectionate. When dogs have been neutered their energy requirements tend to be lower. It is important to pay careful attention to your dog’s weight in the months after neutering and if necessary to adjust their dietary intake to avoid weight gain.

Can neutering cause incontinence?

A small number of female dogs develop bladder weakness after neutering. They may dribble small amounts of urine especially when lying down. This is more of a problem in some breeds of dogs than others and many of the affected animals would have developed the problem whether or not they were neutered. If this problem does develop it can usually be controlled with daily medication. If you are concerned discuss the risks for your own dog with your vet.

Is it fair to let a female dog have just one litter of puppies?

It is an old wives’ tale that a female needs to have a litter of puppies. What your pet doesn’t know she won’t miss and neutering will save you the trouble and anxiety of finding good homes for the litter.

Is neutering expensive?

Different vets will charge different prices for neutering, costs may vary according to the location of the practice and the quality of the facilities there. If you are concerned about the cost of neutering talk to your vet. On the whole vets want to see as few unwanted puppies as possible and their neutering charges reflect the cost of the procedure. People on low or fixed incomes may be able to get help with the costs of the procedure from one of the animal shelters. However, it is wise the balance the costs of neutering against the expense of having an unwanted litter. A pregnant female will need more food to support herself and her offspring, the litter will need veterinary attention and you may have to advertise to find them good homes.

Laparoscopic Spays (keyhole Surgery)

At the Allcare Veterinary Centre we offer this minimally invasive procedure .Female dogs & cats can now be spayed using keyhole surgery. This minimally invasive surgery is less painful than open surgery and there is a much faster recovery for your pet. The keyhole surgery is carried out through 2 small incisions. We use electro surgery to seal the blood vessels so that the whole procedure is virtually bloodless. There are no external stitches so there is no need for a return visit to remove stiches and also there is no need for a buster collar.

AGE TO NEUTER YOUR PET

  • Bitches (The following is to ensure that the bitch is skeletally mature before neutering):
    • Up to 15kgs, spay at 5.5 months – 7 months
    • 15-35kgs, spay at 7-9 months, after first heat
    • 35kgs + , spay at 18 months
  • Male dogs: 5 months old
  • Cats (both male and female): 4.5 months
  • Rabbits (female): 6-9 months
  • Rabbits (male): 4.5 months
  • Guinea pigs (males only): 4 months

Overpopulation

Ireland has five times more stray dogs than the UK. The chances of a dog becoming a stray and ending up destroyed is 20 times greater for a dog in Ireland than it is for a dog in the UK. There is an overpopulation crises and the ongoing destruction rate of 27 dogs per day in Irish pounds is a result of this crisis. While no official figures exist for numbers of stray or destroyed cats in Ireland, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest that the country’s feline destruction rate is even higher than the canine equivalent.

Reasons for Neutering

  • Neutering increases your pet’s changes for a longer, healthier life – Spaying your female pet reduces her chances of developing mammary cancer and eliminates the threat of uterine and ovarian infections.
  • Neutering your male dog or cat prevents testicular cancer and may prevent prostate problems. Neutered cats are less likely to roam and fight or get killed on the roads.
  • A neutered dog or cat is a better pet – Males neutered early in life are less aggressive towards other dogs and are not distracted by females in heat.
  • Spaying your female pet eliminates the problem of stray males camping in your garden and decreases her desire to roam and breed.
  • Spaying prevents your pet from giving birth to unwanted puppies and kittens. It also stops the messy and difficult twice-annual heat period. You are helping to alleviate the dog and cat overpopulation problems we have in Ireland.

Excuses for Not Neutering

  • “My pet will get fat and lazy”
    Pets that become fat and lazy after being neutered are usually overfed and under exercised.
  • “Shouldn’t a female pet have one litter first?”
    Allowing a female dog/cat to produce a litter does not have any benefits. There are health risks to the mother during the pregnancy and when giving birth. Finding good homes for puppies and kittens is not easy. Even if you manage to place your pet’s offspring, you are condemning to death the numbers of unwanted animals in shelters and pounds who are in desperate need of good homes.
  • “Spaying and Neutering isn’t natural”
    Humans domesticated animals and brought them into our lives. The environment we and our pets live in is very different from the natural one. We have made them dependent on us, which means we are responsible for their well being, just as we are with any other family member.
  • “We can sell the litter and make money”
    Even well known breeders are fortunate if they break even on raising purebred litters. Vaccinations, health care costs and feeding consume most of the profit.
  • “I am concerned about my pet undergoing anaesthesia”
    Although there is always a slight risk involved, anaesthetics used by veterinarians are very safe. The medical benefits of having your pet neutered or spayed far outweigh the slight risk involved with undergoing anaesthesia.

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Christmas Time for Pets

 

  • Female animals: The common name for neutering a female is spaying, which consists of removing the uterus and ovaries. The technical term is ovario-hysterectomy.
  • Male animals: The common name for neutering a male is castration, which involves the removal of the testicles.

Ages for Neutering

  • Bitches (The following is to ensure that the bitch is skeletally mature before neutering):
    • Up to 15kgs, spay at 5.5 months – 7 months
    • 15-35kgs, spay at 7-9 months, after first heat
    • 35kgs + , spay at 18 months
  • Male dogs: 5 months old
  • Cats (both male and female): 4.5 months
  • Rabbits (female): 6-9 months
  • Rabbits (male): 4.5 months
  • Guinea pigs (males only): 4 months

Overpopulation

Ireland has five times more stray dogs than the UK. The chances of a dog becoming a stray and ending up destroyed is 20 times greater for a dog in Ireland than it is for a dog in the UK. There is an overpopulation crises and the ongoing destruction rate of 27 dogs per day in Irish pounds is a result of this crisis. While no official figures exist for numbers of stray or destroyed cats in Ireland, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest that the country’s feline destruction rate is even higher than the canine equivalent.

Reasons for Neutering

  • Neutering increases your pet’s changes for a longer, healthier life – Spaying your female pet reduces her chances of developing mammary cancer and eliminates the threat of uterine and ovarian infections.
  • Neutering your male dog or cat prevents testicular cancer and may prevent prostate problems. Neutered cats are less likely to roam and fight or get killed on the roads.
  • A neutered dog or cat is a better pet – Males neutered early in life are less aggressive towards other dogs and are not distracted by females in heat.
  • Spaying your female pet eliminates the problem of stray males camping in your garden and decreases her desire to roam and breed.
  • Spaying prevents your pet from giving birth to unwanted puppies and kittens. It also stops the messy and difficult twice-annual heat period. You are helping to alleviate the dog and cat overpopulation problems we have in Ireland.

Excuses for Not Neutering

  • “My pet will get fat and lazy”
    Pets that become fat and lazy after being neutered are usually overfed and under exercised.
  • “Shouldn’t a female pet have one litter first?”
    Allowing a female dog/cat to produce a litter does not have any benefits. There are health risks to the mother during the pregnancy and when giving birth. Finding good homes for puppies and kittens is not easy. Even if you manage to place your pet’s offspring, you are condemning to death the numbers of unwanted animals in shelters and pounds who are in desperate need of good homes.
  • “Spaying and Neutering isn’t natural”
    Humans domesticated animals and brought them into our lives. The environment we and our pets live in is very different from the natural one. We have made them dependent on us, which means we are responsible for their well being, just as we are with any other family member.
  • “We can sell the litter and make money”
    Even well known breeders are fortunate if they break even on raising purebred litters. Vaccinations, health care costs and feeding consume most of the profit.
  • “I am concerned about my pet undergoing anaesthesia”
    Although there is always a slight risk involved, anaesthetics used by veterinarians are very safe. The medical benefits of having your pet neutered or spayed far outweigh the slight risk involved with undergoing anaesthesia.

Neutering a Dog

This is a most important subject. Some owners believe it is unfair to deny their pet the opportunity to breed; however, mating is not necessarily advisable for health or happiness.
Every day in Ireland, approximately 27 unwanted and abandoned puppies and dogs have to be put to sleep…..

The average female dog comes on ‘heat’ twice yearly. This may last for 1 month. During this time, a bitch is ready for mating and pregnancy may result. As well as being messy and inconvenient, she will need to be kept apart from male dogs for the duration to prevent unwanted puppies.

Spaying is now a routine operation, performed under general anaesthetic. It usually involves just a day spent at with us, and she will have recovered fully in approximately 2 weeks.

KEYHOLE SPAYING

At the Allcare Veterinary Hospital we offer the option of Laparoscopic neutering which is minimally invasive and had rapid recovery

  • Female dogs are generally spayed about 5.5 months of age, but your pet can be spayed at any age.
  • A spayed bitch will not come into season again, and so will not become pregnant.
  • Spaying prevents womb infections, which are very serious, and can be life threatening.
  • Spayed bitches are far less likely to develop mammary or breast cancer, which can be life threatening also.
  • After spaying dogs will not put on weight, as long as they are fed sensibly and exercised regularly. You may find that your dog does not require as much food after the operation.
  • Contrary to popular belief, neutering has absolutely no affect on a dog’s temperament or personality. It is just an old wives tale that a dog needs to have a litter of puppies.
  • Uncastrated male dog’s behaviour can alter greatly when a local bitch is in heat. They will escape at any opportunity, and may cause or be involved in a road traffic accident; get into fights with other dog’s, or worst of all, get lost and go missing, possibly forever.
  • Male dogs are usually castrated at about 5 months of age, but can be done at any age.
  • Neutering or castrating your dog is another straight forward operation, that usually involves just a day stay with us, and dogs usually make a complete recovery within 2 weeks.
  • As well as making your dog less likely to stray, dog’s tend to be less aggressive and less likely to fight, and often more amenable to training.
  • Castrated dogs will not develop testicular cancer, and are far less likely to have prostate trouble or anal tumours.
  • Neutering your dog is not as expensive as you may think…. It is certainly cheaper than the cost of an unplanned pregnancy and raising a litter of pups, or the vet’s bill following your dog’s road accident.
  • Neutering is the only guaranteed way of preventing unplanned puppies being born, and the needless destruction of thousands of dogs every year.

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A PET IS NOT jUST FOR CHRISTMAS

A PET IS NOT JUST FOR CHRISTMAS

A pet is not just for Christmas.It is estimated that more than one-in-five puppies or kittens given as Christmas presents will ultimately be handed into shelters as unsuitable.

If you are thinking about buying a pet for Christmas, ask yourself a few questions before making this big decision.

Am I ready for a commitment?

Owning a pet is a lifetime commitment. The average dog lives for 13 years. The average lifespan for a cat is 15 years but they can live into their twenties.

Do I have the time?

Be honest, do you have the time to devote to looking after a pet? They are similar to babies in the time and energy they demand. They can not be left alone for hours. They need to be house trained and they also need play time, including socialisation with other animals.

Am I financially ready?

Really consider whether you have enough disposable income to pay for a pet’s needs. Vaccinations, spaying, neutering , food, toys , cattery or unexpected vet appointments and surgeries aren’t easy on the wallet.

Will my lifestyle still accommodate a dog or cat in five to fifteen years?

Think about the future. Do you own your home, or do you rent?Does your tenancy agreement allow you to keep pets? Are you planning to move away in the next couple of years? Make sure to take all those factors into consideration before getting a cat or dog.

Is Christmas really a good time to get a new pet?

Christmas is always a very hectic time of the year with relatives and friends arriving. Unusual noise, activities and extra demands upon the household can make it difficult for any pet to settle into their new homes.

Here are some tips to keep your  pets safe and well over christmas.

DON’T feed your pet left overs from your Christmas meal. Poultry bones can get stuck or cause perforations, and rich food can cause vomiting and diarrhoea.

DON’T feed your pets christmas cake or mince pies as raisins (and grapes) are toxic. Some dogs can eat quite a few grapes or raisins without any obvious side effects, others can eat just a few and suffer fatal kidney failure.

DON’T feed your pet chocolate, it’s another potential toxin. (For more information see our winter poisons post.)

DON’T leave pets unattended around your Christmas tree. Pets love playing and chewing with bright shiny objects, including fairy light wires. Electrocution or gastro-intestinal blockages could occur.

DO ensure that your pets have someone quiet they can take themselves off to, if you are expecting lots of guests.

DO ensure your pets are microchipped so they can be identified. They may get cold in winter weather or scared by Christmas festivities and seek shelter in unlikely places. Don’t leave your pets unattended outside- they can be quickly stolen leading up to christmas time and sold on. keep them safe and well and in your sight

DO wrap up short haired dogs, (and those that are young or old), with dog jackets, if you are out walking in very cold weather.

DO wash your dog’s feet if they have been walking on gritted pavements. The salt can be very irritant to their paws.

DON’T allow pets near frozen ponds or canals. However often people are warned of the dangers, nearly every year fatalities (both animal and human) occur.

DON’T GIVE PETS AS PRESENTS! A dog is for life, not just for Christmas. <3 <3

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Felv and Fiv (feline aids) in cats

478FBB09-4E1C-4C6C-95AE-594001F540D2Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)

In the last few months we have noticed  a huge increase in stray cats testing positive for fiv and felv . The best way to protect your cat is by neutering and vaccination.

At the Allcare Veterinary Centre in Killarney we include felv in our basic vaccination program

Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) are viruses that infect cats only. These viruses act somewhat like the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in people; cats infected with FeLV or FIV develop severely compromised immune systems. Infected cats can appear perfectly normal but will usually die within a few years of overwhelming infections or certain types of cancer. The viruses are transmitted by close cat to cat contact such as mutual grooming and bite wounds. Kittens born to an infected mother can be infected before birth or through the mother*s milk. Fortunately, a simple blood test can tell us if a cat or kitten is carrying one of these viruses.

FeLV /FIV Testing

Who: All new cats or kittens entering a household. This is particularly important if you have other cats at home that could potentially be at risk of being exposed. New *house mates* should be kept separate from each other until the FeLV/FIV status of each cat is known.
– Any kitten or cat with unexplained or chronic disease
– Any cat with significant dental disease or gingivitis

What: A screening test (ELISA) for FeLV/FIV can be performed on a small blood sample from your cat. Results are generally available within 48hrs.

When: Ideally, testing should be done as soon as possible after acquiring the new kitten or cat. Samples may be obtained during a routine office appointment such as a “Health Check” or vaccinations or we may ask you to leave your pet with us for a short while.

Why: FeLV/FIV are devastating diseases for cats. While there is no cure, early diagnosis can help us keep affected cats as healthy as possible for as long as possible. More important however, is that early diagnosis can help prevent the spread of the virus to other cats.

Since it is impossible to tell if a cat or kitten is infected with one of these viruses just by looking at them (or by looking at the mother cat), we recommend that EVERY new cat or kitten entering a household be tested for FeLV and FIV.

Please ring us at 0646637333 for information or to book an appointment ,

Protect your Pets at Halloween

65856A82-1017-4AB3-BFDD-BEA6F544A21FHalloween is approaching and now is the time to prepare your pet for this scary time.Over the Halloween period, if your pet has only recently developed sensitivity to fireworks or noises, try to act as if there is nothing to be scared of – jolly him along and praise him for responding positively. However, if your dog has a serious or long-standing phobia, give him attention if he requires it – he’ll be too scared for this to act as a reward, so it won’t encourage the unwanted behaviour and instead he will benefit from the comfort that this gives him. Essentially though, try to find out what helps him to cope and be sure to let him do this, – e.g. letting him hide under the table – don’t try to coax him out, if this is where he feels safest – he’ll come out when he’s ready and then you can praise him.

Should you fear your pet will be scared
You can use the following

ThunderShirts
– a calming vest that applies gentle, constant pressure that may help your dog or cat feel safe and secure we can order one for you at the Allcare Veterinary Centre.
Adaptil spray,
collar or plug in diffuser – releases dog appeasing pheromones that help calm your dog,
Feliway
works equally as well for cats cats
Pet Remedy –
a blend of essential oils that can help calm the nerves of anxious or stressed pets
Keep your dog busy with interactive toys such as those that can be stuffed with tasty treats, such as
Kongs

At very noisy times around Halloween, provide your dog or cat with
a safe hiding place (
a suitably sized cardboard box would do) in his favourite room of the house and close the curtains. If it is not possible to black out your windows, consider taping black bin liners to them. Also turn up the volume of your television or radio to drown out the firework noises. Remember not to shut any internal doors, as your pet may feel trapped and panic.

Please don’t leave your dog alone in the house, as he may panic and injure himself.

A stodgy high-carbohydrate meal (e.g. with well-cooked rice or pasta) in the late afternoon may help make your dog feel more sleepy and calm during the evening. Also make sure he goes out for a walk and to toilet before it gets dark and the fireworks start.

Please consult us on 06437333 if you think your pet will really struggle this Halloween with fireworks as there are now several anxiety reducing drugs available for dogs and cats .

Your family should also consider the following points to ensure the safety of your dog during this spooky time:

Do not leave your dog alone outdoors during the Halloween period, scared dogs will make desperate attempts to escape and there is the danger of him being injured by a stray firework or even stolen.
Be extra careful when opening the door as your dog may escape; if possible, try to ensure there is another closed door between your dog and your front door. Please also make sure that your dog is wearing a collar and an ID tag and that his microchip details are up to date via www.fido.ie in case he escapes (microchipping and the possession of a microchipping certificate are legal requirements).
Never force your dog to wear a dog costume – loosely tied festive doggie bandanas are usually more acceptable to dogs.
Keep the treats and sweets away. Chocolate, raisins and the sweetener xylitol are poisonous to dogs. If you suspect your dog has eaten anything he shouldn’t, please call us immediately and always store their out of hours emergency number on your phone.
Do not force your pet to receive any unwanted attention even from family members, as they may not recognise people in costumes.
Please think twice about taking your dog on a trick or treat outing. The extra excitement around the event and meeting strangers may cause him distress.
Keep lit pumpkins out of your dog’s reach as they run the risk of burning themselves or knocking them over and causing a fire.
Please keep a close watch on your pet this Halloween to reduce any chance of distress, so that he or she and the rest of the family can enjoy the celebrations without any mishaps.

We hope you and your pets have a safe Halloween!

Dental Problems in cats and dogs

64BFE586-FBE4-4F81-917B-CFFBB40039B0Dental disease is very common in cats and dogs. Surveys show that after the age of three years, about seven out of ten pets have some kind of tooth disorders. If left unattended these may cause irreversible damage to the dog’s teeth, gums and jawbones. Stopping the build up of plague can prevent dental disease.

 Signs of dental disease 

Plague is a yellowish white deposit made up of bacteria and debris, which forms around the surface of the teeth. In time it hardens to become yellowish brown tartar (sometimes called calculus) at the base of the tooth which gradually spreads until it may cover the whole of its surface. As well as the visible tartar there may be other indications of disease. Foul breath is very common and the pain resulting from advanced dental disease may cause difficulties in eating. If your dog dribbles excessively and sometimes this is flecked with blood or shows signs of pain and discomfort such as head shaking and pawing at its mouth it may have problems with its teeth.

However it is uncommon for them to express pain and they can suffer in silence. Therefore it is very important to check the teeth regularly.

How does dental disease affect my pet’s health ?

The tartar hidden below the gum line is the main cause of problems. It contains bacteria which will attack the surrounding gum tissue causing painful inflammation (gingivitis) and infection can track down to the tooth roots. Pus may build up in the roots and form a painful abscess. This inflammation wears away tissue from the gum, bones and, as the disease becomes more advanced, the teeth will loosen and fall out. Bacteria and the poisons they produce can also get into the bloodstream and cause damage throughout the body in organs such as the kidneys, heart and liver.

How can dental disease be treated ?

Any loose teeth will have to be removed because the disease is too advanced to be treated. Your vet may prescribe antibiotics before doing dental work if there are signs of infection. Your vet will remove the tartar and clean the remaining teeth, usually with an ultrasonic scaling machine. Finally, your dog’s teeth will be polished to leave a smooth surface which will slow down the build up of plaque in the future. However, it is inevitable that plaque will re-appear. To keep your dog’s teeth in good condition it is likely that they will need regular scaling and polishing, in some cases at intervals twelve months

In the wild your pet’s teeth would be much cleaner because its diet would contain harder material than are found in commercially tinned or packaged foods. Cats and dogs naturally eat the bones, fur, etc of their prey, which wear away deposits of tartar. Replacing soft foods with dry or fibrous materials will slow the build up of plaque. The extra chewing involved helps control infection because it stimulates the production of salvia which has natural antibiotic properties. There are special diets to help maintain clean teeth. We also have a liquid you can add daily to the drinking water that prevents tartar buildup in cats and dogs .

What else can i do to keep my pets teeth clean ?

Brushing your pet’s teeth is just as important in preventing dental disease as brushing your own. Ideally your pet should get used to its teeth being cleaned from an early age. Wrapping a piece of soft gauze around your finger and gently rubbing the pet’s teeth should get it used to the idea. You can then move on to using a toothbrush specially designed with soft bristles. Toothbrushes, which fit over the end of your finger, are available for cats and dogs

For those of you who find this difficult you can use dentagen  aqua daily in the drinking water .

. There are some mouth washes and antibacterial gels, Logic oral gel, which can help to reduce plaque deposits and prevent infection. Do not attempt to use human toothpaste, which will froth up in mouth, your pet will not like the taste and it could your pet serious harm.

We are also recommend special foods  for both dogs and cats which help to maintain good oral health.

PLEASE RING our specially trained nurses at the All Care Vetero Centre for a free dental check on

0646637333

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dog and cat hospital|pet clinic|pet hospital|Killarney vet

dog and cat hospital|pet clinic|pet hospital|Killarney vet